Rare Book Monthly

Articles - April - 2011 Issue

Books and Libraries:  The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Renoreview

Special Collections would be axed at UN-Reno under Provost's proposal.

These are apocalyptic times in the book and library world as we know them. The year 2000 may not have been the beginning of end of the world for humanity, but for the book and library world, in hindsight, maybe. Two major events have come together to turn this world upside down. One is the development of the electronic reader, which has quickly evolved from another trendy device to the eventual heir to the printed book. The other is the devastating recession, the worst since the Great Depression of the 1930s, and the way we have chosen to respond to hard times. Buried within the inevitable change in how we read, and the role libraries will play in the future, is the question of what becomes of our old and rare books, and the great collections built over the years.

 

I think we can safely say the battle between electronic readers and printed books is over. Printed books will not disappear, at least not in our lifetime, but electronic editions will become the predominant form. Coming generations will read on a screen, not paper. That leaves the question of what becomes of all of those millions of old, pre-electronic era books out there, their texts gradually being retrofitted into digital impulses, but physically still held in collections in their original form. Here we look to the newswires, and see some news, both positive and disheartening.

 

Johns Hopkins University is adding a $30 million extension to its main library, called the Brody Learning Commons. According to the Johns Hopkins Newsletter, it is designed to be a "student-friendly space," as compared to the "bunker-feeling" of the main library. It has been carefully designed to provide wireless connectivity throughout with "no dead spots." There will be a café to facilitate social interaction, "integrating learning and coffee." Who needs Starbucks? "Indeed, it will truly be a 21st century library," the article states.

 

Oh, one more thing. The BLC will not have books. They are not being eliminated from Johns Hopkins, as the old library will still have stacks of them. It's just the place where students will want to go that won't have books. However, there is one exception, and this will enable those who cherish rare and antiquarian books to take heart - "Other than the rare books, the BLC will not have stacks for any other books." Recent and common books, as well as textbooks, may not be found in this human-friendly new library building, but a place is being set aside for a rare book room. We believe that this is the way it should be in this new age of digital reading. We need to preserve a part of our past, as that is who we are, so we can enable future generations to understand and participate in our history. It is important for coming generations to understand where we have been as they plot the course to where we will go. This is a good choice Johns Hopkins has made.

 

Some less encouraging news comes out of the University of Nevada in Reno. Here, budgetary constraints may lead to perhaps shortsighted short-range solutions. A brief notice on the home page of the university's special collections explains, "As many people have heard, Special Collections is one of the units on campus that would be closed as part of the Provost's proposal to reduce expenses to cover the university's budget shortfall of $59 million." According to their website, Special Collections houses 20,000 books, 200,000 photographs, manuscripts, architectural plans, and historical maps. The major areas of focus are Nevada and the Great Basin, the book arts, and rare books in general.

 

In justifying this cut, the Provost's proposal states that while preservation of material has been a historic function of libraries, and serves "an important public service function," it is "less directly connected to the University's broader instructional and research emphases than other discrete parts of the University Libraries." Specifically, the proposal states:

 

"The department and its specific collections would remain dormant into the foreseeable future.

 

Retrieval of materials housed in the Department would be made on an as-needed basis by other library staff.

 

Digitization projects reporting through Special Collections would cease.

 

Additions to the dormant collections in the form of purchased acquisitions would cease; gifts would be discouraged or redirected, as appropriate, to the State Historical Society."

 

Naturally, some library employees will be losing their jobs too. Obviously, any bookseller hoping to offer material to the University will have to wait a long, long time, perhaps forever. When a library says it will discourage even gifts, purchases are but a dream. There is nothing in the notice threatening to sell off their collection, but maintaining one of this size is not inexpensive. One can only wonder whether library-as-albatross eventually becomes library-as-source-of-revenue as unwillingness to adequately fund it drags on.

 

Once upon a time, we suffered through a Great Depression. Despite the enormous financial difficulties, we still managed to fund a Federal Writers' Project and other programs to keep our writing and art alive. A decade later the greatest peacetime expansion America has ever seen began, our arts and culture still intact. Such a commitment through even moderately hard times no longer appears to be so clear. What this bodes for our future is unknown.

 

 

Rare Book Monthly

  • <b>Chiswick Auctions: Summer Books. August 22, 2018</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Aug. 22:</b> Adams (Richard). <i>Watership Down,</i> FIRST EDITION, author inscription on front free end paper, folded map tipped in, original boards, dust-jacket. £800 to £1,200
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Aug. 22:</b> Bowles (John). <i>Several Prospects of the Most…la Ville de Londres, avec des Remarques Historiques fort Succinctes, qui les Regardant,</i> 20 double page engraved plates only, of 23, 1724. £200 to £300
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Aug. 22:</b> Auden (W.H.). <i>Our Hunting Fathers,</i> FIRST SEPARATE EDITION, 1 of 22 copies, COPY B OF 5 PRINTED ON NORMANDIE, original patterned wrappers, Cambridge, for Frederic Prokosch, 1935. £800 to £1200
    <b>Chiswick Auctions: Summer Books. August 22, 2018</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Aug. 22:</b> Barrie (J. M.) & Attwell (Mabel Lucie, illustrator). <i>Peter Pan & Wendy,</i> FIRST EDITION, 12 chromolithograph plates, publisher's blue cloth, original printed dust jacket, [c.1920]; and 3 others (4). £200 to £300
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Aug. 22:</b> Bartolozzi (Francesco). Genius Calling Forth the Fine Arts to Adorn Manufactures and Commerce; Agriculture (Husbandry Aided by Arts and Commerce), glazed and framed. £200 to £300
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Aug. 22:</b> A collection of engraved caricatures, including Gillray ([James]) Tales of Wonder!, 1802; Rowlandson (Thomas) Sports, Smock Racing, 1811;Irish Jaunting Carr, 1814. £400 to £600
    <b>Chiswick Auctions: Summer Books. August 22, 2018</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Aug. 22:</b> Bennett (Charles H, illustrator). <i>Æsop’s Fables,</i> 1875; Buchanan (Robert). <i>Ballad Stories of the Affections,</i> [1866]; Douce (Francis), The Dance of Death, 1833. £200 to £300
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Aug. 22:</b> Chinese Illustrations. A group of 6 Cantonese rice paper illustrations, depicting scenes of torture with different instruments, gouache, c.340 x 220mm, original wrapper boards preserved, [c. 1800]. £200 to £300
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Aug. 22:</b> Dulac (Edmund). <i>The Queen of Romania, The Dreamer of Dreams,</i> 5 coloured plates, [1915]; and others illustrated by Edmund Dulac. £300 to £400
    <b>Chiswick Auctions: Summer Books. August 22, 2018</b>
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Aug. 22:</b> Fronth (Per). Xingu Chronicles, the portfolio, comprising 30 plates, photogravues in colours, each signed, dated and titled in pencil, each numbered 10/35, on wove paper, 790 x 600 x 60mm, 1997. £300 to £400
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Aug. 22:</b> Pasternak (Boris). <i>Doctor Zhivago,</i> FIRST ENGLISH EDITION, original red publisher’s cloth, pictorial dust jacket, 4to, Collins & Harvill Press, 1958. £200 to £300
    <b>Chiswick Auctions, Aug. 22:</b> 13 sepia photographs of visitors to the Thermes Nationaux d’Aix-les-Bains, c. 150 x 105mm, c.1890 (12). £300 to £400
  • <b>Bonhams: September 25, New York</b>
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Ernst, Max. <i>Mr. Knife and Miss Fork</i>. Paris, 1932. DELUXE EDITION. Sold for $15,625
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Cage, John. Autograph musical leaf from his Concert for Piano and Orchestra, NY, 1958. Sold for $18,750
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Cage, John. Autograph musical leaf from his Concert for Piano and Orchestra, NY, 1958. Sold for $18,750
    <b>Bonhams: September 25, New York</b>
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Einstein, Albert. Signed Passport Photo for his US citizenship application. Bermuda, 1935. Sold for $17,500
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Verard, Antoine. Illuminated printed Book of Hours. Paris, 1507. Sold for $7,500
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Wetterkurzschlussel. German Weather Report Codebook - for Enigma use. Berlin, 1942. Sold for $225,000
    <b>Bonhams: September 25, New York</b>
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Morelos y Pavon, Jose Maria. Autograph letter signed to El Virrey Venegas, February 5, 1812. Sold for $6,250
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Milne, A.A. Complete set of <i>Winnie-the-Pooh</i> books. 4 volumes. All first issue points. London, 1924-1928. Sold for $5,250
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> A 48-star American Flag, battle worn flown at Guadalcanal and Peleliu, 1942-1944. Sold for $35,000
    <b>Bonhams, June 12 results:</b> Locke, John. Autograph Letter Signed mourning the death of his friend, William Molyneaux, 2 pp, October 27, 1698. Sold for $20,000
  • <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Charles Darwin on sexuality and the transmission of hereditary characteristics: Autograph Letter Signed to Lawson Tait. Down, 17 January [1877].
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> MILTON, JOHN. <i>Paradise Lost. A Poem written in ten books.</i> London: 1667. A very rare example with the contemporary binding untouched and with a 1667 title page.
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> Hamilton secures the ratification of the Constitution: <i>The Debates and Proceedings of the Convention of the State of New-York, assembled at Poughkeespsie, on the 17th June, 1788.</i>
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> The social contract “Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains”: ROUSSEAU, JEAN-JACQUES. <i>Principes du Droit Politique [Du Contract Social]</i>. Amsterdam: Michel Rey, 1762
    <b>19th Century Shop:</b> “The first English textbook on geometrical land-measurement and surveying”: BENESE, RICHARD. <i>This Boke Sheweth the Maner of Measurynge All Maner of Lande…</i>
  • <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Luis de Lucena, <i>Arte de Ajedres,</i> first edition of the earliest extant manual on modern chess, Salamanca, circa 1496-97. Sold for $68,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Carte-de-visite album with 83 images of prominent African Americans & abolitionists, circa 1860s. Sold for $47,500.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Gustav Klimt, <i>Das Werk,</i> Vienna & Leipzig, 1918. Sold for $106,250.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Man Ray, <i>[London Transport] – Keeps London Going,</i> 1938. Sold for $149,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Thomas Jefferson, Letter Signed, to Major-General Nathanael Greene, promising reinforcements against Cornwallis, 1781. Sold for $35,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Nicolas de Fer, <i>L’Amerique Divisee Selon Letendue de ses Principales Parties,</i> Paris, 1713. Sold for $30,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Russell H. Tandy, <i>The Secret in the Old Attic,</i> watercolor, pencil & ink, 1944. Sold for $35,000.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Ernest Hemingway, <i>Three Stories & Ten Poems,</i> first edition of the author's first book, Paris, 1923. Sold for $23,750.
    <b>Swann Auction Galleries:</b> Walker Evans, <i>River Rouge Plant,</i> silver print, 1947. Sold for $57,500.

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